Team Members

Fellows

Lisette Abdiruhman in a red patterned hijab

Lisette Abdiruhman

JHU-MSU Graduate Teaching Fellows

MA, Union Institute and University in History and Culture

Gilman Hall, Suite 90
labdiru1@jhu.edu

Lisette is currently a doctoral candidate at Morgan State University, where she is researching Black Women and Islamic Movements in the Early 20th Century 1920-1950. She will use her 20 years of experience working in independent and public charter schools and research to help develop innovative courses using Africana archives and object-based teaching, and will offer a course at Morgan State in the spring on Black Women in the Archive of Slavery. She will also serve as an advisor to undergraduate Dean’s Undergraduate Research Awardees managed by Gabrielle Dean, Sheridan Libraries Curator.

Jennie Chaplin

Jennie Chaplin

Slavery and Justice Curatorial Fellow

PhD, American Studies

Gilman 90 B
jchapli3@jhu.edu

Jennie Chaplin is an advocate for the cultural arts and the Gullah Geechee culture, Jennie Chaplin grew up in Charleston, South Carolina, and now resides in Washington, DC.  She holds a Master’s degree in African American Literature from Howard University.  She received her PhD in American Studies from the University of Maryland, specializing in museum studies, historic preservation, and material culture. Her articles on the culinary and visual arts, music, and social justice have been published in Whetstone Magazine, History @Work in The National Council of Public History, and Whetstone Magazine.  In her spare time, she loves reading, writing, watching documentaries, and becoming acquainted with the neighborhood’s four-legged friends.  

Kai Clemons

Kai Clemons

Graduate Research Assistant Historical Justice, RIC 

Kai Clemons is a graduate student at Morgan State University (MSU) studying African American Studies. She first began her academic journey when she minored in Africana Studies at Kent State University earning her BA in Psychology.

Throughout their undergraduate career, they developed an affinity for research and travel while also working as a research assistant, a McNair Scholar, and an abroad-learning student. They became a published researcher under the PsychoHairapy Research Lab in 2020. Her overall work focuses on the nuances, cultivation, and sustainability of Black identity among Black youth. Currently, Kai serves as a Program Assistant for the AAAD (African American & African Diaspora Studies) minor at MSU and recently returned from Cali, Colombia in collaboration with a nonprofit that provides political education and diasporic study abroad opportunities for youth of Baltimore. She is currently finishing her MA thesis that analyzes the Black Panther Party’s educational initiatives and its pedagogical impact on the self-concept of Black youth within the 20th century. 

Jeneanne Collins

Jeneanne Collins

Community Arts Fellow

MA, Maryland Institute College of Art 

Gilman Hall, Suite 90 B
jcolli88@jhu.edu 

Jeneanne Collins is a practicing performance poet and community artist, and sometimes a mixed – media creator. Recently, she served as an Artist in Residence at Union Baptist Church where she conducted oral archive interviews as part of the B&O Railroad Museum’s Oral History Project in partnership with the church. She developed a series of workshop responses entitled “Churches & Trains”, Black History Every Day. Collins is also a member of the #nopermission collective, a group of artists that use visual, performance and alternative art to activate/charge historically oppressed spaces.

Sherella Cupid

Dr. Sherella Cupid

Document Fellow

Ph.D., University of Maryland, Baltimore County

scupid1@jh.edu

Sherella Cupid (Ph.D., University of Maryland, Baltimore County) is the Document Fellow for Inheritance Baltimore. Dr. Cupid’s research uplifts the experiences of Black women and girls in education and work, with a focus on sister circles in health, media, and education, as well as mentorship for Black doctoral women and Black faculty women. Additionally, she is a co-editor for the series, Research, Theory, and Practice Within Academic Affairs, which seeks to explore current trends, practices, and challenges within academic affairs. Lastly, she creates digital sister circles via her podcasts, Sista Docs Exhale (SDE) and Lirae Journey.

Jessica Douglas

Jessica Douglas

Community Arts Fellow

MLIS candidate, University of Maryland, College Park

Gilman Hall, Suite 90
jdougl30@jhu.edu

Jessica Douglas is an archivist and researcher from Baltimore whose work focuses on community-based, participatory, and reparative theory and practice in archives and libraries. In addition to her prior work as a reference archivist, she works with individuals and organizations to conduct archival and historical research, particularly related to Black history and local (Baltimore and Maryland) history. She holds a B.A. in Political Science and History from Fordham University in the Bronx, NY and is currently pursuing her Master’s in Library and Information Science at the University of Maryland, College Park.

Walter Gill

Dr. Walter Gill

Elder in Residence, Billie Holiday Center for Liberation Arts

Walter (Wali) Arthur Harris Gill was born in Greenville, Mississippi. He received his public education in Jefferson City, Missouri and Baltimore, Maryland. He was the first African American to graduate from the previously all-white and all-male Baltimore City College High School in 1955; and is in the school’s Hall of Fame. 

Gill earned a B.S. and received his R.O.T.C. Commission from Morgan State College in 1960.  For 20 years, he was a university administrator or professor at four universities: Bowie State University, Morgan State University (where he was the first faculty hired for the Telecommunications Department in 1978), the University of Nebraska (where he received a recommendation for tenure), and Millersville University. Dr. Gill is a Life Member of the Morgan State University National Alumni Association and the Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc.

Dana Green

Dana Green

HBCU Graduate Assistantships for Programming and Digital Publishing & Oral History Fellow

MA, History

Gilman Hall, Suite 90
dgree130@jhu.edu

Dana Green is a native of Akron, Ohio and began her career in history as an undergraduate student at Bethune Cookman University. While there she worked as a tour guide in Dr. Mary McLeod Bethune’s home. After graduating from Bethune Cookman, she began a Master’s Degree in History Program at North Carolina Central University. She is currently a PhD Student majoring in History with a concentration on feminism and the civil rights movement at Morgan State University.

Sheharyar Imran

Sheharyar Imran

Graduate Research Assistant Historical Justice, RIC

shimran@jhu.edu

Please add this bio with Sheharyar’s profile. 

Sheharyar Imran is a PhD candidate in Political Science specializing in International Relations and Political Theory. His research and teaching interests include political ecology, land rights and dispossession, racial capitalism, postcolonial/critical race theory, and global development. Sheharyar’s dissertation explores how modern global order is produced by the historical processes and extractive logics of environmental racism and racial capitalism. In particular, he examines the dynamics of socio-ecological exploitation underlying territorial expansion, the globalization of capitalist property regimes, Eurocentric regimes of sovereignty and belonging, and the transnational expansion of mega-infrastructure.  

Sheharyar is the 2023-24 Graduate Fellow for the Program in Racism, Immigration (RIC) and works closely with the Critical Diaspora Studies Working Group. His research and teaching have been supported by the Program in Medicine, Science, and Humanities (MSH) and the Dean’s Teaching Fellowship awarded by the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences. Previously, Sheharyar earned his B.A. in International Studies from Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, NY. 

Jamal R. Moore

Jamal R. Moore

Artist in Residence, Billie Holiday Center for Liberation Arts

Jamal R. Moore is a native of Baltimore, Maryland who is a multi-instrumentalist, composer/performer and educator. His background includes California Institute of The Arts (M.F.A. 2012), Berklee College of Music (B.M 2005), Eubie Blake Jazz Orchestra (2000) under the direction of Christopher Calloway Brooks, and the historical acclaimed Frederick Douglass Sr. High whose notable alumni include Thurgood Marshall, Cab Calloway, and Ethel Ennis. 

Some notable luminaries Jamal has worked and recorded with are Wadada Leo Smith, Roscoe Mitchell, Nicole Mitchell, Archie Shepp, David Ornette Cherry, Tomeka Reid, Dr. Bill Cole, DJ Lou Gorbea, George Duke, Sheila E, David Murray, JD Parran, Ras Moshe, Hprizm, (Antipop Consortium) Tatsua Nakatani, Hamid Drake, and the late Yahyah Abdul Majid (Sun Ra Arkestra). He is an affiliate of The Pan African Peoples Arkestra of the late Horace Tapscott, Black Praxis of David Boykin, and member of Konjur Collective. 

Jamal currently leads his own groups, Akebulan Arkestra, Napata Strings, Black Elements Quartet, Organix Trio, and Mojuba Duo. “As musicians we are healers of humanity and have a responsibility to cleanse disease through positive tones, frequencies and vibrations. Music is the nucleus and universal language of the oversoul, mind, body and spirit,” he says.

Xavier Walker

Xavier Walker

Community Arts Fellow

BA, English, Women’s Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Gilman 90 D
xwalker@jhu.edu

Xavier Walker is the newly appointed Inheritance Baltimore Community Archives Fellow and a recent graduate of Lafayette College where he earned a BA in English and Women’s, Gender, & Sexuality Studies. Throughout his undergraduate career he worked with a variety of archives and collections as an intern at the National Museum of African American History and Culture, an EXCEL scholar, and a student worker with Skillman Library’s Digital Scholarship Services. Most notably he spearheaded the ABC Archives Project, a digital archive of over 500 artifacts that chronicle the history and culture of Black life at Lafayette College. Xavier has a passion for community building and enjoys picking up new hobbies, the most recent of which include DJing, rock climbing, and building LEGOs.

Raynetta Wiggins-Jackson

Raynetta Wiggins-Jackson

Africana Archives Curatorial Fellow

PhD, Ethnomusicology, Indiana University

Gilman 90 C
rwiggin7@jhu.edu

Raynetta Wiggins-Jackson embraced the power of music, expressive art, and history during her formative years in Birmingham, AL. She later turned her interests into formal study earning a BA in music from Berea College and a MA and PhD in ethnomusicology from Indiana University. Her work has focused on the research, performance, and preservation of African American music with an emphasis on sacred music in film and media. She is also passionate about the intersections of education and community engagement and partners with artists and educators to research and celebrate the important contributions of African Americans in the arts. Recently, she served as the Manager of Choir Curriculum and Performance at a Washington, D.C. based arts organization where she developed and coordinated educational and program content for their resident community choirs. She currently serves as an Africana Archives Curatorial Fellow with the Billie Holiday Center for Liberation Arts at Johns Hopkins University.

Postdoctoral Fellows

Daniel Cumming

Daniel Cumming

RIC Postdoctoral Fellow

PhD, New York University

Gilman 90 E
dcummi11@jhu.edu

Daniel Cummings has a Ph.D. in U.S. History from New York University, an M.A in Social Sciences from University of Chicago, and an M.A. in Teaching from Johns Hopkins University. His research examines racial inequality in twentieth-century Baltimore by exploring the shifting terrain of housing, labor, and health through the rise of medical institutions and the fall of manufacturing. As I argue in my dissertation, the toxic features of the Jim Crow industrial order became social, political, even embodied, foundations of the postindustrial metropolis. Originally from the Pacific Northwest, Dr. Cummings lived in Baltimore and taught high school students at Carver Vocational-Technical High School.

Tali Ziv headshot

Tali Ziv

RIC Postdoctoral Fellow

PhD, University of Pennsylvania

Gilman 90 E
ziv1@jhmi.edu

Tali Ziv’s research explores dynamics of care at the intersection of community-based health services and mass incarceration in the United States. She charts the processes, both historical and contemporary, through which care emerges from the political-economic relations that govern racialized, urban inequality. Spanning the fields of Anthropology, Public Health, and Africana Studies, Dr. Ziv’s research attends to the everyday experiences of giving and receiving health services in contexts of addiction, incarceration, and community reentry from jail/prison.

Staff

Tonika Berkley

Tonika Berkley

Archivist for Africana Collections

MA, University of Maryland, College Park

410-516-5492
tberkle1@jhu.edu 

Ms. Berkley is a historical researcher, museum educator and curator, working for various museums in Baltimore, Washington, DC, and Philadelphia, including the Walters Art Museum, the Baltimore Museum of Industry, The Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture, and Penn Museum of Archeology and Anthropology. In 2018-19, Ms. Berkley served as Research Coordinator and Curator of prototype physical and digital exhibitions for “Education Will Be Our Pride: The Colored School at the Peale (1878-89)”, and curator of a 3D scanned tour of the Peale building, based on the history of Male and Female Colored School No. 1. She also coordinated the development of a microsite, “School1,” an online repository for the history of 19th century education of African Americans in Baltimore City and surrounding counties.

Ms. Berkley earned her Bachelor’s degree from UMBC in Sociology/Anthropology, her Master’s Degree in Applied Anthropology (Heritage/Historical Archeology track) from the University of Maryland College Park and her teaching credentials from Notre Dame of Maryland University. She is currently pursuing her Masters in Arts Administration and Museum Leadership from Drexel University.

Renee White Buchanan

Renee White Buchanan

Budget Analyst

BS, Accounting

Gilman Hall, Suite 90
rwhite88@jhmi.edu

Mrs. Renee White has many years of experience in federal, state, and local grants management. Renee obtained her Bachelor’s degree in Accounting from University of Baltimore, and Graduate Certificate in Business Administration from University of Baltimore.

Angela Koukoui

Angela Koukoui

Co-Director of the JHU-UB Community Archives Program

MLIS, University of Maryland, College Park

410-837-4268
arodgerskoukoui@ubalt.edu 

Angela Koukoui is an Outreach Archivist and Public Service Coordinator at the University of Baltimore RLB Library, Special Collections, and Archives, where she leads instruction sessions in archival literacy. Angela has taught Community Archive Workshops through various partnerships and collaborations since 2017. In her archival work, Angela worked on the Preserve the Baltimore Uprising project at the Maryland Historical Society and curated The Baltimore Cultural Arts Program, 1964-1993 photography exhibit at UB in 2016. A revised version of The Baltimore Cultural Arts Program, 1964-1993, was featured as a digital exhibit in 2020. In 2021, Angela curated 40 years of HIV/AIDS digital exhibit collaborating with the Baltimore City Health Department in spring 2021.

Shawntay Stocks

Shawntay Stocks

Assistant Director of Fellowships and Community Engagement

PhD, University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Merganthaler 227
(443) 297-7827
sstocks3@jhu.edu 

Dr. Shawntay Stocks has over a decade of experience in service and community-based learning, coordinating service and diversity programs, and teaching. Dr. Stocks obtained her Bachelor’s degree in History from Guilford College, Master’s degree in English and African-American Literature from North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, and her Ph.D. in the Language, Literacy and Culture program at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Her dissertation research focused on faculty diversity within higher education. Dr. Stocks is trained in Critical Participatory Action Research (CPAR) which she utilizes in planning and executing training in areas of diversity, equity, inclusion, and community-based learning. Additionally, Dr. Stocks uses her poetry as a reflective tool within her workshops and trainings.

Faculty

Nathan Connolly

Nathan Connolly

Convener, Racism and Repair in the Modern Academy

PhD, University of Michigan

Gabrielle Dean

Gabrielle Dean

Inheritance Baltimore Curatorial Lead

PhD, University of Washington

Lawrence Jackson

Lawrence Jackson

Convener, Working Group on Slavery, Conciliation and Justice

PhD, Stanford University

Jennifer Kingsley

Jennifer Kingsley

Associate Teaching Professor and Director, Museums and Society

PhD, Johns Hopkins University (History of Art)

Joseph Plaster

Joseph Plaster

Curator

PhD, Yale University

Headshot of Stuart Schrader in red shirt

Stuart Schrader

Convener, Racism and Repair in the Modern Academy

PhD, New York University